Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Oregon State University, Corvallis (new 2011)

DeMuro Awards Announced for Exceptional Historic Preservation, Reuse, and Community Revitalization

The Astoria Train Depot (1925), Astoria – restored as the Barbey Maritime Center (2013)

The Astoria Train Depot (1925), Astoria – restored as the Barbey Maritime Center (2013)

The Burkes-Belluschi House (1948), Portland – restored as family residence (2011)

The Burkes-Belluschi House (1948), Portland – restored as family residence (2011)

The US Forest Service Ranger Station (1936), Sisters – repurposed as the Fish Inn/Bike Inn (2011)

The US Forest Service Ranger Station (1936), Sisters – repurposed as the Fish Inn/Bike Inn (2011)

Furman Hall (1902), Corvallis – rehabilitated for Oregon State University School of Education (2011)

Furman Hall (1902), Corvallis – rehabilitated for Oregon State University School of Education (2011)

Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Oregon State University, Corvallis (new 2011)

Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Oregon State University, Corvallis (new 2011)

The Ladd Carriage House (1883), Portland – repurposed as the Raven & Rose Restaurant (2012)

The Ladd Carriage House (1883), Portland – repurposed as the Raven & Rose Restaurant (2012)

The Oswego Iron Furnace, (1866) Lake Oswego – restored as educational and tourism destination (2010)

The Oswego Iron Furnace, (1866) Lake Oswego – restored as educational and tourism destination (2010)

 

Restore Oregon announced the recipients of its first annual DeMuro Awards today at a benefit reception in Portland. The Award honors extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects and compatible infill development across Oregon – residential and commercial, urban and rural, private and public.

The award is named in honor of Art DeMuro whose redevelopment of historic properties such as Portland’s White Stag Block set the standard for quality, creativity, persistence, and business acumen. Keynote speaker for the ceremony was Portland Mayor Charlie Hales whose remarks focused on the importance of preserving historic places to create livability and economic viability.

Located from Sisters to Astoria, recipients of the 2013 DeMuro Award are:

The Astoria Train Depot (1925), Astoria – restored as the Barbey Maritime Center (2013). An outstanding example of community collaboration, its new use as an instructional center for traditional maritime crafts passes forward the history of Astoria’s waterfront.

The Burkes-Belluschi House (1948), Portland – restored as family residence (2011). The home of internationally renowned Modern architect, Pietro Belluschi, was restored by his son, architect Anthony Belluschi, and expanded with a graceful addition and guest house.

The US Forest Service Ranger Station (1936), Sisters – repurposed as the Fish Inn/Bike Inn (2011). Scheduled to be burned down, a local contractor set an example for the community through their campaign to move and restore this modest ranger’s house as a vacation rental.

Furman Hall (1902), Corvallis – rehabilitated for Oregon State University School of Education (2011). Transformed a beloved-but-obsolete building in OSU’s historic district that was literally falling apart. Seismically unsound and wrapped in netting to protect pedestrians from crumbling sandstone, Furman Hall was structurally rebuilt, its interior redesigned, and sandstone façade replaced in kind.

Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Oregon State University, Corvallis (new 2011). An outstanding example of compatible infill development, this major new building harmonizes beautifully with its neighbors. It makes a distinct statement that’s of its time, yet is complementary in scale, massing, proportion, and materials, enhancing the story of the historic district.

The Ladd Carriage House (1883), Portland – repurposed as the Raven & Rose Restaurant (2012). Originally an elegant carriage house, this property evolved into retail space, office space, and finally a restaurant. From beginning to end, this is a story of persistence and good will, from the property owner and developers, the preservation community and design team, to the restaurateur who stepped forward and saw it to completion.

The Oswego Iron Furnace, (1866) Lake Oswego – restored as educational and tourism destination (2010). This project reconnected a community with its industrial roots and restored the last known blast furnace west of the Rockies. What once provided the iron that built the Pacific Northwest now serves as an important educational and heritage tourism center.

“The purpose of the DeMuro Awards is to celebrate those who steward Oregon’s historic places with particular excellence, persistence, and impact,” says Restore Oregon Executive Director, Peggy Moretti. “These are examples of what is possible and we hope the lessons learned on these projects can inform and inspire others across the state.”

More in-depth stories on each DeMuro Award project will be posted in the Restore Oregon newsroom in the weeks ahead. The custom stoneware awards were designed and donated by LoneSomeVille Pottery. DeMuro Awards sponsored by:

ecotrust_logo-small D+R-logo RestoringHistory_retro_300hLonesomeville Pottery Co.

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