IceHouse_EaglePt

Ice House, Eagle Point

IceHouse

IceHouse

IceHouse_CashStore_historic

IceHouse_EaglePt

IceHouseEntry

IceHouseHistoric

Ice House, Eagle Point

Statistics

  • Location: 419 N Royal Ave, Eagle Point
  • Built: approx. c.1877
  • Architect: unknown
  • Designation: None
  • Significance: The c.1877 ice house is the last remaining component of the original George Brown and Son Cash Store and is a contemporary of the National Register of Historic Places-listed Butte Creek Mill.

News and Updates

December 2014:

Building remains standing, but funding has not materialized

April 10, 2013:

Economically viable use still to be determined

December 2012:

University of Oregon graduate student Benjamin Stinnett prepares historic structure report on building

May 25, 2012:

Eagle Point ice house preservation will be tricky
Outlet: Daily Journal of Commerce

May 22, 2012:

Listed as one of Oregon’s Most Endangered Places by Restore Oregon

History

The Ice House was built in approximately 1877 for the George Brown and Son Cash Store that was located on Royal Ave in Eagle Point. The building is constructed of fieldstone walls with a dirt floor covered by planks of wood and the remnants of an irrigation pump.

When a fire burned the store to the ground in the early 1900s, the ice house remained as a vestige of Jackson County’s pre-refrigeration and pre-electricity era. In the mid-2000s the owner of the building prepared plans to demolish it, only to be spared by a last-minute purchase in 2008.

Why is it Endangered?

Despite its local significance and proximity to the operational Butte Creek Mill, the Ice House is in need of structural upgrades, interior improvements, and a viable use to keep the building alive and maintained. The load-bearing masonry walls are in need of stabilization and repointing and the structure is at-risk of significant damage in the event of even the smallest seismic event.

While supportive of preservation and reuse, the property owner needs resources and preservation planning to preserve the building for the future.

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