DeMuro Award

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Tickets for the 2015 Restoration Celebration are available now!

The 2015 Restoration Celebration (photo: Drew Nasto)

2015 DeMuro Awards by Lonesomeville Pottery (photo: Drew Nasto)

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Art DeMuro speaking at the Pittock Mansion 2012

Treasurer Ted Wheeler gave the keynote speech at the Restoration Celebration where the 2014 DeMuro Awards were announced. (photo: Drew Nasto)

Treasurer Ted Wheeler gave the keynote speech at the Restoration Celebration where the 2014 DeMuro Awards were announced. (photo: Drew Nasto)

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Guests socialized with sparkling wine at the Restoration Celebration (photo: Drew Nasto)

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was the featured speaker at the 2013 DeMuro Awards. Photo by Drew Nasto

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was the featured speaker at the 2013 DeMuro Awards.
Photo by Drew Nasto

Anthony Belluschi accepted a DeMuro award for his thoughtful and sensitive work on Pietro Belluschi's Burkes-Belluschi house. Photo by Drew Nasto

Anthony Belluschi accepted a DeMuro award for his thoughtful and sensitive work on Pietro Belluschi’s Burkes-Belluschi house.
Photo by Drew Nasto

DeMuro Award

The DeMuro Award honors extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects and compatible infill development across Oregon – residential and commercial, urban and rural, private and public. The award is named in honor of Art DeMuro whose redevelopment of historic properties such as the White Stag Block set the standard for quality, creativity, persistence, and business acumen.

The DeMuro Award is the only state-wide award in Oregon recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects. We announce our annual award winners at the Restoration Celebration, our most important fundraising event of the year.  This year’s event was an enormous success thanks to our wonderful sponsors and donors. and everyone who attended.


Recipients of the 2015 DeMuro Award for projects exemplifying excellence in preservation, adaptive reuse, and community revitalization are:


 

THE ARLENE & HAROLD SCHNITZER CENTER FOR ART AND DESIGN, Portland – A surplus Federal Building (1918) was brought back to its historic glory and expanded into a world-class educational facility for the Pacific Northwest College of Art. [Gerding Edlen, developer; Allied Works, architecture; Howard S. Wright Construction]

THE BLOCK HOUSE CAFE, Dayton – Though historic churches are very difficult to repurpose, the long-empty former First Baptist Church of Dayton was respectfully repurposed as a café. It’s now an anchor destination in downtown Dayton. [Twin Towers, LLC, developer; Paul M. Falsetto, Architect; Fackler Construction]

THE ERICKSON FRITZ APARTMENTS, Portland – Two of the most colorful, but long-neglected buildings in Portland’s Old Town – the 1912 Erickson Saloon and the Fritz Hotel – were restored and converted into much-needed mixed-income housing. [Innovative Housing, Inc., developer; LRS Architects; ORANGEWALLstudios architecture + planning; Silco Commercial Construction]

THE HOTEL JULIAN APARTMENTS, Corvallis –The 1892 hotel had become run-down Section 8 housing, but was restored to a state of grace and dignity for its residents and neighbors, demonstrating that preservation can serve the under-served. [Northwest Housing Alternatives, developer; Willamette Neighborhood Housing Services (WNHS) co-developer and current owner, Carleton Hart Architecture; Walsh Construction]

OLD SALTY, Seaside – Up for sale as a tear-down, an abandoned 1910 beach cottage was saved, restored on a budget, and furnished with salvage and garage sale treasures. [Brian & Melody Emerick, owners; Emerick Architects; Hazen & Johnson, contractor]

THE SPARTA BUILDING, Medford – A gleaming example of Main Street restoration, this 1911 American Renaissance style building is bringing new life to Medford’s historic downtown. [Tater Rental LLC, developer; Kramer & Co, historic consultant & design; Norway Construction]

WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL, Portland – After standing vacant and deteriorating for over 20 years, the old school is now beautifully restored as retail and creative office space, while retaining original features such as lockers, blackboards, and the auditorium which is now an events and performance venue. [Venerable Properties and Pacific Realty Associates, developer; SERA Architects; Bremik Construction]

 


 

 

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