DeMuro Award

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Treasurer Ted Wheeler gave the keynote speech at the Restoration Celebration where the 2014 DeMuro Awards were announced. (photo: Drew Nasto)

Treasurer Ted Wheeler gave the keynote speech at the Restoration Celebration where the 2014 DeMuro Awards were announced. (photo: Drew Nasto)

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Treasurer Ted Wheeler at the Restoration Celebration (photo: Drew Nasto)

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The 2014 DeMuro Award recipients at the Restoration Celebration (photo: Drew Nasto)

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Guests socialized with sparkling wine at the Restoration Celebration (photo: Drew Nasto)

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was the featured speaker at the 2013 DeMuro Awards. Photo by Drew Nasto

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was the featured speaker at the 2013 DeMuro Awards.
Photo by Drew Nasto

Anthony Belluschi accepted a DeMuro award for his thoughtful and sensitive work on Pietro Belluschi's Burkes-Belluschi house. Photo by Drew Nasto

Anthony Belluschi accepted a DeMuro award for his thoughtful and sensitive work on Pietro Belluschi’s Burkes-Belluschi house.
Photo by Drew Nasto

DeMuro Award

The DeMuro Award honors extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects and compatible infill development across Oregon – residential and commercial, urban and rural, private and public. The award is named in honor of Art DeMuro whose redevelopment of historic properties such as the White Stag Block set the standard for quality, creativity, persistence, and business acumen.

The application for the 2015 DeMuro Awards will be available this summer!


Recipients of the 2014 DeMuro Award for projects exemplifying excellence in preservation, adaptive reuse, and community revitalization are:

FIRE STATION No. 7, Portland (1927) – Serving SE Portland’s Buckman Neighborhood, Fire Station No. 7 was one of 24 fire houses designed by Fire Chief Lee Gray Holden, and is said to have been the pride of his career.  Decommissioned and long-neglected, it was rehabilitated for office use while retaining its character-defining features, including the fire pole.  (Venerable Properties, Emerick Architects, Bremik Construction)

GALLERIA BUILDING / TARGET, Portland (1910) Known historically as the Olds, Wortman, and King Department Store, the Galleria Building was first saved from the wrecking ball by Bill and Sam Naito. It continued to struggle until the opportunity came along to return it to its department store roots as an urban Target store.  Historic features were restored, even as modern retailing systems were incorporated and a sleepy corner of downtown was revitalized. (Bill Naito Company, FFA Architecture and Interiors, and KPFF Engineers)

THE IRVINGTON TENNIS CLUB, Portland (1912) – Beautiful and functional, a reconceived addition to the original Ellis Lawrence-designed clubhouse is highly compatible with the historic main building and the surrounding National Register-listed neighborhood.  (Irvington Tennis Club, Scott | Edwards Architecture, P&C Construction)

MEIER & FRANK DEPOT/VESTAS N. AMERICA HQ, Portland (1927) – Empty for over a decade, a sad landmark on the edge of Portland’s Pearl district has been transformed into 21st century workspace.  Now headquarters for Vestas North America, Urban Airship, and Gerding Edlen, this project offers LEED Platinum proof that historic preservation and sustainability go hand in hand.  (Gerding Edlen, GBD Architects, Skansa Construction)

WHITESIDE THEATER, Corvallis (1922) – An icon in a historic downtown struggling for a cultural and economic renaissance, the Whiteside had gone “dark” for many years until an intrepid band of volunteers tackled a structural rehab and restored the 1950s marquee.

(Whiteside Theater Foundation, Andrew Pearson Architecture, Bob Grant Construction)


 

Take a virtual tour of the 2013 DeMuro Award Recipients!

Statewide Partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Cut and paste this letter and add your personal comments. In addition to your Representative and Senator, send a copy to info@restoreoregon.org and to the Senate Finance Committee: anna.grimes@state.or.us

VOTE YES on the REVITALIZE MAIN STREET ACT (SB 565)

Date

Senator or Representative Name

Address

 

Dear ________,

Our historic downtown is the cultural and economic core of the community and members of our downtown business association and city government are working hard to bring the district back to life.  But the cost of much-needed building restoration, code compliance, and seismic retrofitting remains financially out of reach in many cases.

[insert personal comments or an example of a needy building here. ie ] is an example.

We urge you to support and advocate for The Revitalize Main Street Act (SB 565) as a modest, cost-effective investment that will help revitalize our downtown and pay dividends for decades to come in the form of new jobs, income and property taxes, cultural heritage and tourism, business incubation, seismic safety, and the reuse of existing infrastructure.

The Revitalize Main Street Act creates a state Historic Rehabilitation Fund to provide a 25% rebate for the certified rehabilitation of historic commercial buildings – stores, hotels, theaters, apartments, factories, mills, etc.  It would be funded by the public auction of state income tax credits (similar to the Oregon Film Production Credit) at a capped amount of $12M per year.  The money stays here in Oregon and we end up with long term, tangible assets.

An economic impact study conducted by EcoNorthwest states that Oregon would be economically better off with this incentive.  In 2018 with a state investment of just $10.6M we would see:

  • 4X more buildings restored than without the state incentive.
  • 1,369 jobs per year generating income of $25.5M.
  • $2.3M net increase in property taxes per year to pay for schools and services.
  • $13.3M new federal Historic Tax Credit dollars invested in Oregon per year.
  • $35.8M net annual increase in direct development spending.

Historic rehabilitation incentives have been proven effective in 35 other states as a targeted means to attract private investment and capture more federal tax credit dollars. This is particularly important in smaller towns.

It’s time for the state to invest in Oregon’s Main Streets and pass the Revitalize Main Street Act in 2015.

Sincerely,

 

Name

Title/Business (if appropriate)

Address

cc: Senate Finance Committee: anna.grimes@state.or.us ;  Restore Oregon: info@restoreoregon.org